Rooms With a 125 Year View

If the Oaks could talk, she would have a lot to say.  She was born in 1774 to loyalist Judge Timothy Paine (1730 – 1793) of Worcester, Massachusetts.  She housed soldiers during the Revolution.  She was home to Dr. William Paine (1750 – 1833) who is credited with opening Worcester’s first apothecary and was one of the founding fathers of the American Antiquarian Society.    The Oaks was subsequently home to William’s son, Frederick William Paine (1788 – 1869) who served his community as representative to the General Court, selectman, and community assessor.  He was a perpetual scholar and gave generously to the American Antiquarian Society’s library. When Frederick’s widow died in 1892, the Oaks almost died along with her.  She stood abandoned for over 20 years until the Colonel Timothy Bigelow Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution saw her historical value and breathed life back into her rooms.  The Oaks made her debut as a tea house in 1914.  She served as the workplace for the Betsy Ross Squad during World War I.  She was a local Red Cross headquarters during World War II.  She has been the chapter house for 100 years of Daughters with the desire to preserve and promote local history, and to honor and remember soldiers of all generations. Before the Oaks was sealed up for her two-decade slumber through the turn of the 20th century, someone had the foresight to photograph some of her rooms.  The black and white photos were taken around 1890, and the ones in color were taken from the same angle on an ordinary day in January of 2015.

Small dining room in 1890.  This room originally served as the kitchen when the house was constructed in the late 1700s.

The small dining room in 1890. This room originally served as the kitchen when the house was constructed in the late 1700s.

The small dining room in 2015, which was originally  the kitchen in the 1700s.

The small dining room in 2015, which was originally the kitchen in the 1700s. The table seen here knew John Adams as a dinner guest back in the day. The table can be seen in the next photo in the large dining room in 1890.

Dining room in 1890.

The large dining room in 1890.

The large dining room in 2015, which also serves as the boardroom for the Col. Timothy Bigelow chapter.

The large dining room in 2015, which also serves as the boardroom for the Col. Timothy Bigelow chapter.

Parlor in 1890.

The parlor in 1890.

The parlor in 2015.

The parlor in 2015.

Bedroom in 1890.

The bedroom in 1890.

Bedroom in 2015.

The bedroom in 2015.

Looking into the library in 1890.

Looking into the library in 1890.

Looking into the library in 2015.

Looking into the library in 2015.

Inside the library in 1890.

Inside the library in 1890.

Inside the library in 2015.

Inside the library in 2015.

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3 thoughts on “Rooms With a 125 Year View

  1. Linda Hart says:

    Frederick William Paine was also one of the founders of Worcester County Horticultural Society (Tower Hill) and served as their treasurer from 1841-1869 when he died. His portrait is on exhibit in the Milton Gallery at Tower Hill (Jan 10 to Jan 24, 2015) to honor him and 12 other early founders. The program is called PLANTSMEN: Portraits of the Founders

    Like

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